Podcast on Collaborative Games

Amanda-SemenoffBack in June 2017, PignPotato’s Amanda Semenoff joined forces with C.D. Saint to launch a new podcast called Overthinking Conflict: Exploring the Business, Skills, and Styles of Peacemaking. They’ve been producing great content for anyone interested in peacemaking work, and it’s well worth checking out the whole series.

1514706779673More recently, however, Amanda took the time to record her thoughts on Collaborative Games. Of course, she talks about Zombie Fight or Flight, but the focus is more on collaborative games generally and their potential in shifting dynamics in conflict. Check it out for interesting reflections on the role games can play in peacemaking work!

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LICRSH Winners!

We are excited to announce the winners of the first ever Legendary International Conflict Resolution Scavenger Hunt!

The winning team completed EVERY task!

Congratulations to The Resolutionaries!

The Resolutionaries are: Wendy Lakusta (team leader), Cheryl Berry, Tamara Throssell, Sandy Milne, and Colleen Spier.

The Resolutionaries will each receive a Listening Bot (from Gary Hirsch’ BotJoy) to help them in their mediation practice and, perhaps, beyond.

Listening Bots

(Here‘s a few ideas on how to use bots in mediation. We’re hoping to hear lots of new ideas from this incredibly creative team!)

Runners-Up

Scoring was incredibly close amongst the top 3 teams! Congratulations to the second and third place teams who are both very well represented in our highlights!

  • Team WinWin
  • The Parleying Pirates

Honourable Mentions go The DenoueMonsters and The Common Grounders who also made the highlights reel for best submissions on specific tasks!

Check out highlights here!

Museum of Salvaged Relationships

Museum of Salvaged RelationshipsCreated as an item for the first ever Legendary International Conflict Resolution Scavenger Hunt (LICRSH), PignPotato Games invites submissions to the online Museum of Salvaged Relationships.

Inspired by the global, crowd-funded Museum of Broken Relationships, we’d like to hear inspiring stories about salvaged relationships! Tell us the story of a relationship that was falling apart and how it was saved. And share a photo of an artefact of that relationship that carries meaning.

We are launching this Museum during Conflict Resolution Week in BC with its theme of “There’s Another Story“, but submissions are welcome anytime! You don’t need to compete in LICRSH to submit items.

11 Ways to Use Collaborative Games for Conflict Prevention/Management/Resolution

Over the past few months, we’ve had the chance to test our own collaborative game – Zombie Fight or Flight – as a tool for conflict prevention, management and resolution.  We’ve spent a lot of time thinking about and discussing the ways in which these games can be used, have invited ideas from others in workshops and presentations, and have reached out to colleagues for their thoughts on collaborative games more generally. The following list identifies 11 ways we’ve seen collaborative games used to prevent, manage or resolve conflicts:

  1. As a training exercise for parties interested in having more collaborative collective bargaining negotiations.
  2. As “homework” assignment for newly blended families who are working to manage disputes.
  3. To “break the ice” at the beginning of a mediation.
  4. In training with lawyers, law students, and conflict resolution professionals to open up discussions of competition and how automatically competitive mindsets impact negotiations.
  5. As a tool for illuminating board members’ interactions, prior to a facilitation of a non-profit board of directors.
  6. To flatten organizational hierarchies, creating an environment where decision-making and leadership must be shared
  7. In elementary school classrooms, to enhance students ability to work together and be more ready to learn.
  8. In high school classes to explore the idea of collaboration in Law and Social Justice.
  9. In college classrooms, as an opening exercise for newly assigned lab partners or learning teams.
  10. In office lunch rooms, to foster a more collaborative workgroup.
  11. Games have been used to bridge generations, to create a space where old and young, and those of various physical and mental abilities can engage in a joint endeavour despite their differences. (For example, check out Joan Braun’s discussion of intergenerational conflict management here.)

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be adding posts that more fully explore each of these possibilities. And we’d love to hear of more uses! Let us know how (and where) you’ve used collaborative games.